HOW TO: PROTECT YOUR ATV; Locks and Insurance

HOW TO: PROTECT YOUR ATV; Locks and Insurance

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I hate thieves…  I wish I could just shoot them and be done but there seems to be too many in the world looking to prey upon your hard work. You can find online forum posts where peoples atvs have been stolen out of their garage, storage unit and even their truck and or trailer. The daring criminals can even steal your bikes from your campsite.

 

I really don’t want anyone stealing my precious atvs.  I have worked to long and too hard to have those disappear out of my possession.  Because of this fear, I have taken a few steps to minimize the damage. They are quick and easy and give you peace of mind.

There are a few simple steps you can use to help protect your investment.

Insurance.

Insurance is the best way to keep your investment safe. It will pay you cash you if your quad is stolen, stolen and wrecked or parted out.  It can also protect you from liability such as damaging or hurting another party.

My four wheelers are insured through my car insurance carrier Nationwide. It costs me $150 a year per bike. I have covered a 2007 Yamaha Raptor and a 2008 Yamaha Grizzly 450.

There are many insurers out there. Most major auto insurance companies have policies for atvs. Geico has a complete power-sports division that can insure ATVs, dirt bikes, Jet Skis and snowmobiles.

Insurance gives you peace of mind 24 hours a day 365 days a year.

Locks

My atvs are always locked up when not in use. I have the keys hidden in a lock box. I have a chain with a pad lock for both bikes.  I also have a lock for the trailer hitch and for the receiver hitch so it can’t be unhooked and attached easily to another vehicle.

Master Lock has a line of products devoted to the motorized crowd.

Receiver Lock

Receiver LockFits both 1/2″ (13mm) and 5/8″ (16mm) diameter receiver holes.

300 stainless steel shackle is corrosion resistant.

Rubber keyway cover protects lock core.

Price: $23.64

Brake Disk LockDisc Brake Lock

2″ (5cm) disc brake lock

1/4″ (6mm) steel shackle

Easy push button locking system with high security cylinder

Price:  $22


Python LockPython™ Adjustable Locking Cable

6′ (1.8m) x 3/8″ (10mm) adjustable locking cable

Patented locking mechanism holds the cable tight at any length

Weather tough aluminum alloy lock, cylinder shutter and vinyl coated cable

Vinyl coated braided steel cable protects equipment from scratches

Price: $30 for 6′

The cable comes in 6′, 12′ or 30′ cables.

And an interesting product I saw on the Master Lock site was this.


Steel CuffSteel Cuff® – 9 Link

3″ (8cm) x 22″ (55cm) Street Cuff® fits fork legs or frames; can be secured to sign posts, parking meters or another bike

Compact and lightweight – easily fits in cargo areas

Push button keyless locking convenience

Heat treated patented lock core is virtually pick poof

Pivoting action combined with 22″ (55cm) length provides lockdown versatility

Price: $73.34

GPS/LowJack

There are a variety of GPS products that could be used as a lojack like recovery too. Lojack even has a motorcycle product.

GPS helps police locate stolen ATV

Vigilance is the key to theft deterrent.

Keep an eye out for suspicious people in your area. Notify police if you see someone.

Become friends with your neighbors who can help watch your valuables. Plus it helps to know who is who in your neighborhood.

Keep your equipment locked and insured at all times.

Hopefully the thief will move on to easier targets but if he doesn’t you are prepared.

Follow these basic tips to help avoid becoming a victim of motorcycle theft:
Lock your ignition and remove the key. Most bike thefts occur when the ignition is shut off, but not locked.
Lock the forks or disk brakes with locks that have large, brightly colored tags.
If traveling with other riders, lock motorcycles together when not in use.
If riding alone, lock your bike to a secure, stationary object that can’t be easily dismantled, such as a light pole.
Add an audible alarm to your motorcycle.
When traveling and spending the night at a hotel, locate an outdoor security camera and park your bike in the camera’s view. If this is not possible, park your bike close to your room.
Keep an eye on your bike. When parking at a public event, check your motorcycle periodically, especially immediately after leaving your bike, to make sure there are no suspicious individuals lurking about.
If parking in a garage, block your bike with automobiles, close the garage door and make sure it is locked.
Don’t store your title in your bike’s storage compartment, tank bag or saddlebag. The safest place for your title is at home.
Uniquely mark and then photograph your bike. If thieves take your bike, note its unique markings to law enforcement using the photos you have taken.
Keep your bike registration and insurance identification card on you when you ride.
Be careful about giving out private information on where you live, work or play.
Source: Courtesy of the Motorcycle Safety Foundation

Follow these basic tips to help avoid becoming a victim of motorcycle theft:

Some Preventative Tips to keep your bikes safe

  • Lock your ignition and remove the key. Most bike thefts occur when the ignition is shut off, but not locked.
  • Lock the forks or disk brakes with locks that have large, brightly colored tags.
  • If traveling with other riders, lock motorcycles together when not in use.
  • If riding alone, lock your bike to a secure, stationary object that can’t be easily dismantled, such as a light pole.
  • Add an audible alarm to your motorcycle.
  • When traveling and spending the night at a hotel, locate an outdoor security camera and park your bike in the camera’s view. If this is not possible, park your bike close to your room.
  • Keep an eye on your bike. When parking at a public event, check your motorcycle periodically, especially immediately after leaving your bike, to make sure there are no suspicious individuals lurking about.
  • If parking in a garage, block your bike with automobiles, close the garage door and make sure it is locked.
  • Don’t store your title in your bike’s storage compartment, tank bag or saddlebag. The safest place for your title is at home.
  • Uniquely mark and then photograph your bike. If thieves take your bike, note its unique markings to law enforcement using the photos you have taken.
  • Keep your bike registration and insurance identification card on you when you ride.
  • Be careful about giving out private information on where you live, work or play.

Source: Courtesy of the Motorcycle Safety Foundation

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13 COMMENTS

  1. I think now days insurance is one of the most important thing for ensuring the vehicle. so insurance and security alarm is necessary…thanks for sharing these kind of information…

  2. ATV insurance is the first accessory I add to my ATV before it hits the dirt. I learned the hard way and rolled my heavily modified ATV down a mountain. Total loss ($12,000 Invested). I have had two ATVs since and both were insured before they hit the dirt.

  3. Change the locks – If you’ve moved to a new home you never know who might still have a key. It is important to maintain locks. Five-lever mortise locks are …

  4. I enjoyed your article! These are things that make or break your ATV and its durability. I always use an ATV cover after I ride it so it stays looking great!

  5. Insurance is a vital component that I had not taken into consideration until now. Thanks for the post.

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